Fancy Farmhouse Headboard: Part I

The master bedroom. In theory, it should be an oasis you can retreat to. What’s an oasis if your furniture is rickety though? Or worse yet, what if you don’t really even have furniture? I’m all about creating a mood in each area of the house. The living room should be comfy, but have a light and airy feel for all those parties you plan on throwing. The dining room should have tons of seating and a fabulous buffet for the holidays. And the master bedroom should have sturdy, yet aesthetically pleasing furniture so that when you come home from a long day at work, you can collapse on our bed and drift off into dreamless sleep.

I bet you’re wondering where I’m going with all this idealist talk. Well, a few weeks ago Max and I were debating which headboard to build for our master bedroom – the Fancy Farmhouse and the Wood Shim Cassidy. The sleek lines and classic look of the Fancy Farmhouse finally won us over. With Max gone on his deployment and a new drill in hand, I started on my long laundry list of projects.

The headboard plan was simple enough. I got it off of Ana White’s design website. For ease of use, I copied the materials list and steps below. Usually, I would just link the design and show pictures, but I ended up deviating ever so slightly from the schematics.

I know, I know. In my tips for beginner builders, I recommended never deviating from the plan, but in this case, I feel as if I streamlined it. So if you try and replicate this headboard, I’ll leave it up to you – you can either follow Ana’s design or mine. They’re conceptually the same, but with subtle differences.

Materials List

  • 3 – 1x6x8
  • 2 – 1x2x8
  • 2 – 2x6x8
  • 2 – 2x4x6
  • 1 – 1x3x6
  • 3 – 8 ft stick of Chair Rail
  • 1 – 8 ft stick of Base Cap
  • 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws
  • 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws
  • 1″ finish nails
  • 1 1/4″ wood screws
  • Wood glue
  • Wood filler (stainable)

Cut List

  • 10 – 1×6 at 23 7/8″ (Center panels)
  • 2 – 1×2 at 20 7/8″ (Side center panel trim)
  • 2 – 1×2 at 55″ (Top/Bottom center panel trim)
  • 1 – 2×6 at 55″ (Base of panel)
  • 1 – 2×6 at 62″ (Top of panel)
  • 2 – 2×4 at 49″ (Legs)
  • 1 – 1×3 at 64″ (Top of headboard)

Word to the wise: cut as you go. I cut all ten of the center panel boards and then measured the total width of the finished center panel. The plan says to cut at 55″. My center panel ended up being just shy of 55 1/2″. To save yourself extra trips to Lowe’s, cut as you go 🙂

Directions

  1. Using your kreg jig and a 3/4″ setting, drill a pocket hole every 6-8″ on each of your center panel boards. In addition, drill a pocket hole at the top and bottom of each board. Using 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws, assemble the center panel.image-15 Here you can see all of the pocket holes I drilled on the back.  Below is a picture of how it looked from the front – totally seamless! I love my kreg jig!image-17
  2. Measure the total width of your constructed center panel; cut your 1×2 top and bottom trim according to your center panel’s dimensions. The 1×2 side trim boards will still be 20 7/8″. If you have a finish nailer, you could attach the trim to the center panel or you could screw the trim together using pocket holes, glue to the center panel and screw from the back to hide any holes. I ended up using my kreg jig to screw the trim together to form a rectangle. Then I glued and clamped it to the center panel (make sure you square up the corners!). Once the glue dried, I attached the trim to the center panel from the back with 1 1/4″ wood screws. image-18
  3. Attach the 2×6 base to the center panel with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws. Attach legs to center panel and base with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws. image-16
  4. Attach the top 2×6  to the center panel and legs with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws. For extra stability, I drilled two pocket holes on each end of the 2×6 top board to secure into each of the legs. Again, cut as you go. The plan calls for a 62″ cut for the top 2×6, but when all was said and done, the width of my center panel with the two legs was just shy of 62 1/2″.
  5. Attach the 1×3 to the top 2×6. The 1×3 should overhang while the back is flush with the 2×6. Ensure that there’s 1″ overhang on each of the ends. image-19
  6. Should you choose to attach moulding, make sure you take precise measurements. All corners are cut at 45 degree angles, which means you’ll need a miter box or miter saw. I’m not going to recommend cut lengths because this will depend on your specific headboard.  Once all moulding is cut, attach with glue and 1″ finish nails. The plan calls for base cap and chair rail. For my project, I ended up building with primarily poplar wood; in Lowe’s poplar section, they had a 1 1/4″ and 3/4″ poplar trim, which I ended up using instead of traditional base cap and chair rail. One, it was less expensive and two, I liked the look of it more. 🙂 image-20

Before staining or painting, make sure you fill the nail holes with stainable wood filler. Once dry, sand your entire project with 100 grit sandpaper and then 150 grit sandpaper. After you’ve cleaned off the residual dust, you’re ready to give your project some color and character!

In Part II, I’ll share my staining pictures! If you’ve already liked Hodgepodge Pilot’s Wife on Facebook, then you’ve seen how my first coat of stain turned out. But I haven’t posted pictures yet of my second coat! Oh, the suspense!

Advertisements

12 thoughts on “Fancy Farmhouse Headboard: Part I

    • It’s for a queen size bed. It wouldn’t be too difficult to make it into a king size though! Instead of being 62 inches wide, it would be 81 inches. To adjust, you’d need more center panels (or use wider boards) and longer horizontal pieces for the center panel trim, bottom and top panels and top of the headboard 🙂 is this your first project?!

    • Stain is by far my favorite finish for homemade furniture! It gives your home a beautiful warmth and ambiance 🙂 It’s just tricky and so time consuming! Stain is the best, but it’s so time consuming to achieve the perfect look!

    • Hello again 🙂 That’s the top center panel trim. It’s a 1×2, roughly 55 inches (make sure you measure your own center panel first before cutting! Yours may be slightly wider/narrower depending on the boards you use). The top/bottom/side panel trim forms a rectangle around the center panel and can either be glued and attached with finish nails or screwed in from the back. I screwed it in from the back 🙂 are you getting ready to build your own headboard? So exciting!! Good luck!

      • Thanks. I have been looking every where for that trim. I just can’t seem to find the correct one. I am almost done with my headboard. Just finishing up the trims and decorative pieces. Then ill sand and stain. So excited.

      • Oh my gosh – I must still be in vacation mode. I thought you were talking about the trim. That’s just a regular 1×2 board. Based off your comment, I think you’re talking about the moulding that’s just inside the trim.

        I bought that at Lowe’s in the poplar wood section. Bothe thick and thin moulding was stacked next to the 1x2s, 1x4s, etc. I can’t recall if they had the exact same moulding for pine, oak, etc, but if you head to a Lowe’s and swing by the poplar section, you should be able to find it fairly easily. I have to stop by tomorrow; I’ll see if there’s a specific name for it to help you in your search!

        What kind of stain do you plan on using? You should definitely do a post on your work!

      • Okay. I went ahead and improvise on it. I plan on using a dark walnut and only wipe off some spots so it will be lighter and dark in different areas. I did tester first to see what would look the best. I love the rustic look. I will definitely post my work on here when it’s completed. Which will hopefully be the end of next week. I’m so excited!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s